Outline itinerary

Day 01      Arrive Kathmandu. Meet at the airport and transfer to hotel.  

Day 02      Kathmandu - Sightseeing.                                  B     

Day 03      Kathmandu - Paro (Bhutan)                                 BLD  

Day 04      Bhutan. Sightseeing                                                 BLD

Day 05      Bhutan. Sightseeing                                                BLD

Day 06      Bhutan. Sightseeing                                         BLD  

Day 07      Bhutan. Sightseeing                                                BLD

Day 08      Bhutan - Kathmandu. Free day.                            B

Day 09      Kathmandu Sightseeing. Free in the afternoon.Nepali dinner at with classical Nepalese dance                     BD

Day 10      Depart Kathmandu

General Information:

Time Zone: 5 hours 45 minutes ahead of GMT

Dialling Code: +977

Electricity: 220V, 50 Hz

 

Entry Procedure and Visa Rules:

All foreigners (except Indian nationals) require visas, which can be obtained in advance or on arrival. Passport should be valid at least for six months to enter Nepal and if you are planning to visit Tibet and Bhuatn, good to have one year validity.

Note: Visitors from the following countries should obtain a visa before arrival at the immigration entry points of Nepal: Nigeria, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Switziland, Cameroon, Somalia, Liberia, Ethiopia, Iraq, Palestine & Afghanistan. For more information on visas you can visit www.nepal-consulate.net.au and also email at adelaide@nepal-consulate.net.au or contact immigration of Nepal. Please do not rely (100%) on the website information for visa rules as the website may not have been updated recently. 

Nepalese consulates issue visa in Australia (approx: AU$ 65 for 15 days, 85.00 for 30 days or $ 175 for 90 days) or at entry point's immigration offices provide various duration’s visa on request upon the presentation of a one year valid passport, one passport size photo.

 

Entry points:

By Air: Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu.

By Land: • Kakarvitta, Jhapa • Birganj • Parsa • Kodari , Sindhupalchowk • Belahia, Bhairahawa • Jamunaha, Nepalgunj • Mohana, Dhangadhi  • Gaddachauki, Mahendranagar. Further details can be obtained on request.

 

Duty Free:

Import: 

Apart from your used personal belongings, visitors are allowed to bring to Nepal free of duty 200 cigarettes or 50 cigars, distilled liquor (one 1.15 litre bottle), and film (15 rolls). You can also bring binoculars, movie or video camera, still cameras, laptop computer and portable music devices.

Export:

The export of antiques requires a special certification from the Department of Archaeology. It is illegal to export objects over 100 years old such as sacred paintings and manuscripts that are valued for culture and

religious reasons.

 

Bank & Currency:

Nepali currency is Nepalese Rupees (NRS). Approximately $ 1 is equivalent to Rs 85 to 90.00 (as AUD is a fluctuating currency) Nepalese Rupees (Currency conversion subject to change). Credit cards are accepted in banks, big hotels and many bigger shops. Please retain your cash receipts and for changing local currency into foreign currency on departure at exit points or at the Tribhuvan International Airport departure lounge. Banks in Kathmandu Valley are open between 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. from Monday through Friday except government holidays. Out of Kathmandu valley banks are open from 10 am to 2:30 pm from Sundays through Fridays.

While traveling in Nepal, Australian $ or US$ both currency are accepted by banks or hotels in Kathmandu. When you travel out of Kathmandu or Pokhara, please take local currency.

ATM:

ATM machines are located in a few banks in the capital and Pokhara. We do not recommend you to rely on ATM as they are not widely available, lots of time black out and it does not operate without electricity. If in case you forget password and have one card or anything wrong and taken away by the machine, you could be sort of money. So alternative backup plans are recommended.

Note: Travellers cheques are not accepted in Nepal.

 

Insurance:

A comprehensive travel insurance policy that covers theft, loss and medical treatment and evacuation and $ 200,000 personal liability is recommended. Insurance is must to participate in the tour.

 

Tipping:

Tipping is becoming fairly common in Nepal. Hotels and restaurants already added 10% service charge as tips. If you are going on a trek,  good to save your tipping money to guide and porters.

 

Can I bargain?

Bargaining is commonplace in markets and tourist shops, but recommended to treat it as a form of polite social discourse rather than a matter of life and death.

 

Health Guide:

The golden rule is not to drink tap water or other water from open sources. Bottled water or soft drinks are available widely. Salads and fruit should be washed with purified water or peeled where possible. Food, drinks and snacks from reputable sources are usually safe. Iodine tablets or Iodine drops are alternative means to treat water during the trek. Bottle of water is available to purchase widely.

 

Medical Services:

Medical facilities in Kathmandu Valley are good. The Kathmandu Valley also offers the services of major general hospitals and private clinics. Health posts have been set up by the government in different parts of rural Nepal. However, facilities are not on a western standard.

 

Immunization:

Vaccinations for cholera, meningitis, tetanus and diphtheria, typhoid and Hepatitis A should be considered, however it may be a good idea to get a complete check-up with a travel doctor or your GP before departure. A useful article to read at: http://www.ciwec-clinic.com/CIWEChandouts/Immunizations_Recommended_for_Travel_in_Nepal.pdf 

 

Climate:

Climatic conditions of Nepal vary from one place to another in accordance with the geographical features. In the north summers are cool and winters severe, while in south summers are tropical and winters are mild. Nepal has namely five major seasons: spring, summer, monsoon, autumn and winter.An average temperature drop of 6°C occurs for every 1,000 m gain in altitude. In the Terai, summer temperatures exceed 37° C and higher in some areas, winter temperatures range from 7°C to 23°C in the Terai. In mountainous regions, hills and valleys, summers are temperate while winter temperatures can plummet under sub zero. The valley of Kathmandu has a pleasant climate with average summer and winter temperatures of 19°C – 35°C and 2°C – 12°C respectively.

The Himalayas act as a barrier to the cold winds blowing from Central Asia in winter, and forms the northern boundary of the monsoon wind patterns. Eighty percent of the precipitation is received during the monsoon (June-September). Winter rains are more pronounced in the western hills. The average annual rainfall is 1,600 mm, but it varies by eco-climatic zones, such as 3,345 mm in Pokhara and below 300 mm in Mustang.An interesting fact is that there is no seasonal constraint on traveling in and through Nepal. Even in December and January, when winter is at its severest, there are compensating bright sun and brilliant views. As with most of the trekking areas in Nepal, the best time to visit are during spring and autumn. Spring is the time for rhododendrons while the clearest skies are found after the monsoon in October and November. However, Nepal can be visited the whole year round.

 

Here’s a brief view of the average temperatures and rainfall during peak summer and winter in three most popular tourist areas:

Place

Summer (May, June, July)

Winter (Dec, Jan, Feb)

Max (°C)

Min (°C)

Rain (mm)

Max (°C)

Min (°C)

Rain (mm)

Kathmandu

28.1

19.5

312

19.3

3.0

15.4

Pokhara

29.7

21.3

829.7

20.3

7.7

26.3

Chitwan

33.0

25.3

404.0

24.1

8.3

13.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

Culture:

Customs and traditions differ from one part of Nepal to another. A conglomeration lies in capital city Kathmandu where cultures are blending to form a national identity. Kathmandu Valley has served as the country’s cultural metropolis since the unification of Nepal in the 18th Century.A prominent factor in a Nepali’s everyday life is religion. Adding color to the lives of Nepalis are festivals the year round which they celebrate with much pomp and joy. Food plays an important role in the celebration of these festivals.

 

Religion:

Nepal was declared a secular country by the Parliament on May 18, 2006. Religions practiced in Nepal are: Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, Jainism, Sikhism, Bon, ancestor worship and animism. The majority of Nepalis are either Hindus or Buddhism. The two have co-existed in harmony through centuries.

Buddha is widely worshipped by both Buddhists and Hindus of Nepal. The five Dhyani Buddhas; Vairochana, Akshobhaya, Rathasambhava, Amitabha and Amoghasiddhi, represent the five basic elements: earth, fire, water, air and ether. Buddhist philosophy conceives these deities to be the manifestations of Sunya or absolute void. Mahakaala and Bajrayogini are Vajrayana Buddhist deities worshipped by Hindus as well.

Hindu Nepalis worship the ancient Vedic gods. Bramha the Creator, Vishnu the Preserver and Shiva the Destroyer, are worshipped as the Supreme Hindu Trinity. People pray to the Shiva Linga or the phallic symbol of Lord Shiva in most Shiva temples. Shakti, the dynamic element in the female counterpart of Shiva, is highly revered and feared. Mahadevi, Mahakali, Bhagabati, Ishwari are some of the names given. Kumari, the Virgin Goddess, also represents Shakti.Other popular deities are Ganesh for luck, Saraswati for knowledge, Lakshmi for wealth and Hanuman for protection. Krishna, believed to be the human incarnation of Lord Vishnu is also worshipped widely. Hindu holy scripts Bhagawat Gita, Ramayan and Mahabharat are widely read in Nepal. Vedas, Upanishads and other holy scriptures are read by well learned Brahmin Pundits during special occasions.

 

Customs:

The diversity in Nepal in terms of ethnicity again makes room for various sets of customs. Most of these customs go back to the Hindu, Buddhist or other religious traditions. Among them, the rules of marriage are particularly interesting. Traditional marriages call for deals arranged by parents after the boy or girl come of age.

Nepalis do not eat beef. There are several reasons for this, one being that the Hindus worship cow. Cow is also the national animal of Nepal. Another interesting concept among Nepalis is division of pure and impure. “Jutho” referring to food or material touched by another’s mouth directly or indirectly, is considered impure by Nepalis. Nepalis consider cow dung to be pure for cleansing purposes. During menstruation women are considered impure and hence, are kept in seclusion until their fourth day purification bath.Nepal is a patriarchal society. Men usually go out to work while women are homemakers. However, in cities, roles can differ. Most Nepalis abide by the caste system in living habits and marriage. Rural Nepal is mostly agrarian, while some aspects of urban life carry glitz and glamour of the ultra-modern world.

 

Food:

Nepal does not have a distinct cooking style. However, food habits differ depending on the region. Nepali food has been influenced by Indian and Tibetan styles of cooking. Authentic Nepali taste is found in Newari and Thakai cuisines. Most Nepalis do not use cutlery but eat with their right hand.The regular Nepali meal is dal (lentil soup), bhat (boiled rice) and tarkari (curried vegetables), often accompanied by achar (pickle). Curried meat is very popular, but is saved for special occasions, as it is relatively more expensive. Momos (steamed or fried dumplings) deserve a mention as one of the most popular snack among Nepalis. Rotis (flat bread) and dhedo (boiled flour) also make meals in some homes.

Detail Itinerary

Day 01      Arrive Kathmandu.

Arrive Kathmandu. Upon arrival meet our representative at the airport. Drive to Hotel and free day.  Kathmandu stands at 1350 metres and the valley is surrounded by hills at an altitude of around 2400 metres. There are three important cities in the valley, the most significant being Kathmandu itself. Patan is the most Buddhist of the three and is across the Bagmati River to the south of Kathmandu, but so close as to be almost an extension of the capital. Bhaktapur, also known as Bhadgaon, is the most "medieval" and is situated in the eastern part of the valley.

 

Day 02      ½ day Bouddhanath & Bhaktapur        Sightseeing                       B

Bouddhanath : 8km from the city centre, this is Kathmandu’s largest Stupa. It’s especially colourful on Saturdays, when Tibetan refugees flock here to pray.

Bhaktapur: One of the three ancient cities of Nepal, and the only one to be heritage listed as an entire city, Bhaktapur is the home of medieval art and architecture, as well as thriving local pottery and weaving industries. It is one of the few places left in Kathmandu that is free of cars and maintains a traditional way of life.

Bhaktapur Durbar Square: This spacious, beautiful square is packed from end to end with ancient temples and monuments including the 'Lion Gate' and 'The Bell of the Barking Dogs.' It's a great place to explore for an hour or two and absorb the local life.

Nyatapola Temple: Dating back to 1702, this five-story pagoda is an impressive sight. Staring down at you from the terraces are intricately carved figures of wrestlers, elephants, lions and griffins.

Dattatreya Square: The Dattatreya Square is Bhaktapur's third dazzling gem. The seat of royalty till the 15th century, the area still houses a great number of historic monuments including many wondrous Maths (residential mansions) and temples. The Peacock Window, which is also called the "Mona Lisa of Nepal", is a rare masterpiece in wood. Dating back to the early 15th Century, the unique latticed window has an intricately carved peacock in its centre.

 

Day 03      Kathmandu - Paro (2280 meters):     BLD

After breakfast drive to airport to fly to Bhutan. You will be received by our local representative at the airport and drive to Thimphu. On the way, visit Tamchog Monastery built by Thangthong Gyalpo (Popularly known as Lama Chazampa, which literally means, the Iron Bridge builder) in the 15th century. Thang Thong Gyalpo (1385 – 1464) was a wonder working saint from Tibet who came to Bhutan in 1433 looking for Iron Ore. He built 108 bridges across Tibet and Bhutan, out of which 8 were built in Bhutan. His only surviving bridge is in Duksum (Tashi Yangtse in Eastern Bhutan).

After lunch, visit Memorial Chorten, a monument dedicated to the Third King of Bhutan. Late His Majesty, King Jigme Dorji Wangchuck. The inside paintings and statues provide a very rare insight into Buddhist Philosophy. Changangkha Monastery, Takin Preserve centre and Sangay Gang view point, the Largest and tallest statue of Buddha in the world and Tashichho Dzong. Dinner and overnight in Hotel.

 

Day 04 Thimphu – Punakha (1310 meters): (72 Kms, 3 hours drive).                     BLD

After breakfast, drive to Punakha via Dochula pass. If the weather is clear, we stop for a while at Dochula pass to view Higher Himalayas. While in Punakha, visit Punakha Dzong built in 1637 by Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal and is situated between Pho Chu (Male River) and Mo Chu (Female River). For many years until the time of the second king, it served as the seat of the Government. The construction of the Dzong was foretold by Guru Rimpoche, who predicted, “…a person named Namgyal will arrive at a hill that looks like an elephant”. There was a smaller building here called Dzong Chu (Small Dzong) that housed a statue of Buddha. It is said that Shabdrung ordered the architect, Zowe Palep, to sleep in front of the statue, while Palep was sleeping; the Shabdrung took him in his dreams to Zangtopelri and showed him the palace of Guru Rimpoche. From his vision, the architect conceived the design for the new Dzong, which in keeping with the tradition, was never committed to paper. The Dzong was named Druk Pungthang Dechen Phodrang (Palace of Great Happiness). The war materials captured during the battle with Tibetans are preserved here. Punakha is still the winter residence of Je-Khenpo and The third King, Jigme Dorji Wangchuk convened the First National Assembly here in 1952. After Lunch, excursion to Khamsung Yulley Namgyal Choling Monastery. Dinner and overnight at hotel.

 

Day 05 Punakha – Wangdiphodrang – Thimphu: (Altitude 1310m, 90 kms): BLD

After breakfast, drive to Wangdiphodrang. Enroute stop a while to view Chimi Lhakhang also called the “Temple of Fertility” built by Lama Drukpa Kuenley also popularly known as “Devine Mad man” in 15th century. Lama Drukpa Kuenley (1455 – 1529) was one of the Bhutan’s Favourite Saints who was born in Tibet, trained at Ralung Monastery and was a contemporary and a disciple of Pema Lingpa. He Travelled throughout Bhutan and Tibet as a “Neljorpa” (Yogi) using songs, humour and outrageous behavior to dramatise his teachings of Salvation through sex. Enroute sightseeing in the valley of Wangdiphodrang, it includes: visit to Wangdiphodrang Dzong (from outside) built in 1638. Legend relates that as the people were searching for the site of the Dzong; four ravens were seen flying away in four directions. This was considered auspicious sign, representing the spread of religion to the four points of the compass. The Dzong is situated at the confluence of Mo Chu and Tang Chu rivers. After lunch, drive to Thimphu.  Free for shopping in the evening. Dinner and overnight at Hotel.

 

Day 06 Thimphu – Paro:  (Altitude 2320 m, 58 kms, 1 hour):          BLD

After breakfast, visit the National Library, which holds a vast collection of ancient Buddhist manuscripts followed by visit to Painting School, famous for carving and free hand art and Folk Heritage Museum. After lunch, visit to Handicrafts Emporium to see the exquisite artistry of traditional crafts and textiles. In the evening, drive to Paro. Dinner and overnight at hotel.

 

Day 07 Paro sightseeing: (Altitude 2280m)                               BLD

After early breakfast, Excursion to Taktsang Monastery: A short drive takes us to Satsam Chorten, the trail climbs through beautiful pine forest, many of the trees festooned with Spanish moss, and an occasional grove of fluttering prayer flags. We stop for a rest and light refreshments at the Taktsang Jakhang (cafeteria) and then walk a short distance until we see, clearly and seemingly within reach, Taktsang monastery. The primary Lhakhang was built around Guru Rimpoche’s meditation cave in 1684 by the Penlop of Paro, Gyaltse Tenzin Rabgay; this incredible monastery clings to the edge of a sheer rock cliff that plunges 900 meters into the valley below. Legend has it that Guru Padmasambhava, the tantric mystic who brought Buddhism to Bhutan in 747 AD, flew here on the back of a flying tiger, Dorji Drolo, said to be his favourite consort. 

After lunch, visit the Ta dzong, an ancient watchtower, which has been, since 1967, the national museum of Bhutan then visit Rimpung Dzong (Paro Dzong) built in 1646 by Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal. The Dzong presently houses administrative offices. In the evening, visit the Drukgyel Dzong, now in ruins was built by Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal to commemorate the victory over the Tibetan invaders in1644; the dzong name’s means indeed “ victorious Druk “. The Dzong was used as an administrative center until 1951 when a fire caused by butter lamp destroyed it. Then visit Kyichu Lhakhang, one of Bhutan’s oldest and most sacred monasteries dating from the introduction of Buddhism in the 8th century. Srongsen Gampo: He was a Tibetan king who married a Chinese princess, Wenchen in 641, as a apart of her dowry was a statue called “Jowo” which was an Indian image of Buddha, Sakyamuni as a small boy. In 659, He decided to build 108 Temples in a single day to pin the Ogress to the earth forever and, at the same time, convert the Tibetan people to Buddhism. 6 of these Temples lie in Bhutan, most prominent of them are Jambay Lhakhang in Bumthang and Kichu Lhakhang in Paro. Kichu Lhakhang is said to hold the left foot of the Ogress and Jambay Lhakhang pins the  left knee. Dinner and overnight at hotel.

 

Day 08      Paro - Kathmandu                                                 B

After breakfast drive to the Airport and Farewell. Arrive Kathmandu. Upon arrival meet our representative at the airport. Drive to Hotel. Check-in to the hotel.  Free in the afternoon.

 

Day 09 Kathmandu Sightseeing – ½ day - Patan & Shyambhu Sightseeing      BD

Patan: The ancient city of Patan faces Kathmandu on the southern bank of the River Bagmati. It’s a colourful place rich in Newari architecture, with Hindu temples and Buddhist monuments of the 17th Century nestled harmoniously together in the narrow, winding streets and unexpected squares. Exquisitely carved palaces.

Krishan Mandir: The first of its kind to be built, this 17th Century temple is the only one in Nepal comprised of entirely stone-carved shrines.

Hiranya Varan Mahavihar: A 12th Century, three-tiered Golden Pagoda of Lord Buddha.

Mahabouddha: Mahabouddha can be reached by walking east from the southern end of Durbar Square and then turning right at the sunken water taps. This Buddhist monument is an excellent example of terracotta art and the skill of Patan's ancient craftsmen. The 14th Century monument's obelisk-like design is also unusual in a city of old pagoda roofs.

 

Swayambhunath: Located approximately 4 kilometers, this Buddhist Stupa is said to be 2000 years old. The Stupa which forms the main structure is composed of a solid hemisphere of brick and earth supporting a lofty conical spire capped by a pinnacle of copper gilt. Painted on the four sided base of the spire are the all seeing eyes of Lord Buddha. This hill is a mosaic of small Chaityas and Pagoda temples. Fare well Nepali dinner with Nepalease cultural program in the evening.

 

Day 10 Departure:                                                                     B

After breakfast Drive to airport for your return flight to onward destinations. End of the trip.

Cost Details:

Cost per person in US$

Person

3 Star

4 Star

5 Star

Single supplement

2-3

2499.00

2699.00

6999.00

Depends on the hotel category

4 & above

2299.00

2499.00

6799.00

 

 

The Tour Cost Includes: - Bhutan

  • All Meals [Breakfast /Lunch/Dinner] in respective Hotels.
  • Accommodation [Twin sharing basis]
  • All transportation within the country as per itinerary.
  • Royalty & Govt. Taxes
  • Entrance fees for Museums and Monuments only
  • Visa Fee.
  • Airport tax
  • Guide and driver
  • Sightseeing.

 

The Tour Cost Does Not Include:

  • Insurance Premiums, 
  • Payments for service provided on a personal basis
  • Cost for any services not mentioned in the "Cost Include head"
  • Cost incurred due to mishaps, strikes, political unrest etc.
  • Personal expense in items such as laundry, soft drinks, Camera Charges, Bottle water, incidentals, Portage, Bellboy charges tips or any other services
  • Druk Air fare economy class flight. If business class – it will be extra.

 

The Tour Cost Includes: Nepal

  • Accommodation in Kathmandu with breakfast.
  • Sightseeing tours ( 2 half days)  with English speaking local guide
  • All monument entrance fees
  • All Transportation by private vehicle as per itinerary
  • Airport transfer x 4 times.
  • Farewell dinner with Nepali cultural dance.

 

PRICE  EXCLUDES:

  • Lunch & dinner (Approx 15-20 USD per meal), could be more in higher standard hotels.
  • Personal clothing & equipment
  • Any expenses incurred in emergency evacuation/road block due to any reason
  • Tips for Guide, Driver etc.
  • Travel insurance
  • Nepal visa $ 25 per person and child under 10 years free

Economy class airfare from Beijing to Kathmandu in current far approx: 2499 included.

If business class it will be extra.

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Trip Grade: Moderate to fairly challenging: 

This is a long trek that goes right into high mountain country and Kalapattar (5554m). Physically quite tiring, it involves approx 6-8 hours trekking along rocky ridges. No previous experience is required; you should be moderately fit, used to some regular exercise and enjoy walking in the high altitude conditions.

 

Itinerary changes:

The itineraries for each trip should be taken as a guideline only. Depending on the prevailing situation, you can modify it to some extent after consulting with your guide. However, the date of trek completion should always coincide with the original itinerary. You should keep in mind that this is an adventure trip into the remotest region, where many unforeseen events may contribute to the need for a change in itinerary. In such cases, your guide or we will suggest the best alternative similar to your original.

 

Documents:

All trekking members should provide scan copy of passport to Himalayan Experience at least two weeks prior to departure.

Tour terms and conditions must be signed and sent to Himalayan Experience at least 2 weeks prior to departure.

Copy of insurance must be provided 2 weeks prior to departure.

 

Time Zone:

5 hours 45 minutes ahead of GMT

 

Entry Procedure and Visa Rules:

All foreigners (except Indian nationals) require visas, which can be obtained in advance or on arrival.

 

Visa:

All foreigners (except Indian nationals) require visas, which can be obtained in advance or on arrival. Passport to be valid at least for six months to enter Nepal.

Note:

Visitors from the following countries should obtain a visa before arrival at the immigration entry points of Nepal: Nigeria, Ghana, Zimbabwe, Swaziland, Cameroon, Somalia,Liberia, Ethiopia, Iraq, Palestine & Afghanistan. For more information on visas you may like to visit http://www.immi.gov.np/touristvisa.php. We will be happy to help if you have further questions.

 

Tourist visa fee:

The Royal Nepalese Embassies or consulates (approx: AU$ 85.00) and at entry point's immigration offices provide various duration’s visa on request upon the presentation of a one year valid passport, one passport size photo.

 

Applying in Australia: You can apply in person or by mail to Honorary Consulate of Nepal. Detail information to apply can be found at www.nepal-consulate.net.au

 

Entry points:

By Air: Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu.

By Land:

  • Kakarvitta, Jhapa
  • Birganj, Parsa
  • Kodari, Sindhupalchowk
  • Belahia, Bhairahawa
  • Jamunaha, Nepalgunj
  • Mohana, Dhangadhi
  • Gaddachauki, Mahendranagar

Rest of the details can be obtained at: http://www.immi.gov.np/visa/provisional-visa-arrangement-fee

 

Duty Free:

Import:

Apart from used personal belongings, visitors are allowed to bring to Nepal free of duty 200 cigarettes or 50 cigars, distilled liquor (one 1.15 litre bottle), and film (15 rolls). You can also bring binoculars, movie or video camera, still cameras, laptop computer and portable music devices.

Export:

The export of antiques requires a special certification from the Department of Archaeology. It is illegal to export objects over 100 years old such as sacred paintings and manuscripts that are valued for culture and religious reasons.

 

Currency:

Nepali currency is Nepalese Rupees (NRS). Approximately $ 1 is equivalent to Rs 92.00 Nepalese Rupees. Currency conversion subject to change. Credit cards are accepted in banks, big hotels and many bigger shops. Please retain your cash receipts and for changing local currency into foreign currency on departure at exit points or at the Tribhuvan International Airport departure lounge. Banks in Kathmandu Valley are open between 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. from Monday through Friday except government holidays. Out of Kathmandu valley banks are open from 10 am to 2:30 pm from Sundays through Fridays. ATM machines are located in a few banks in the capital. We do not recommend you to rely on ATM as they are not widely available. Too many blackout hours in Kathmandu valley and Pokhara.

 

Insurance:

A comprehensive travel insurance policy that covers theft, loss and medical treatment and evacuation and $ 200,000 personal liability is recommended. Insurance is must to participate in the tour.

 

Tipping:

Tipping is becoming fairly common in upmarket restaurants in Kathmandu, so leave around 10% of the bill if service was good. Bargaining is commonplace in markets and tourist shops, but treat it as a form of polite social discourse rather than a matter of life and death.

 

Health Guide:

The golden rule is not to drink tap water or other water from open sources. Bottled water or soft drinks are available widely. Salads and fruit should be washed with purified water or peeled where possible. Food, drinks and snacks from reputable sources are usually safe. Try to avoid insect bites by covering bare skin with insect repellent and wearing long sleeve shirts and long pants. Iodine tablets or Iodine drops are alternative means to treat water during the trek.

 

Immunization:

Vaccinations for cholera, meningitis, tetanus and diphtheria, typhoid and Hepatitis A should be considered, however. It may be a good idea to get a complete check-up with travel doctor or your GP before departure.

 

Medical Services:

Medical facilities in Kathmandu Valley are good. The Kathmandu Valley also offers the services of major general hospitals and private clinics. Health posts have been set up by the government in different parts of rural Nepal. However, facilities are not on western standard.

 

Clothing:

Lightweight cotton clothing is recommended from May through October. Warm clothes are needed for winter. An umbrella or a raincoat is a necessity for the monsoons.

 

Climate:

Nepal has a typical monsoonal two-season year. There's the dry season from October to May while wet season of the monsoons last from June to September.

 

People & Religion:

Nepalese people are mainly divided into two distinct groups-the Indo-Aryans and the Mangoloids. Kathmandu Valley is the spiritual and cultural meeting point of all these groups. Hindu Temples and Buddhist shrines are scattered all over the Kingdom. Nepal is the birthplace of Lord Buddha,the Light of Asia. There is a complex blending of Hinduism and Buddhism in Nepal.

 

Dialling Code: 977

Electricity: 220V, 50 Hz

 

Q. Are airport transfers included in the trip price if I arrive or depart out of the tour dates? If not, how much will a taxi cost from the airport?

Transfers are generally included in the price for everyone who arrives on the tour start date and departs on last day of the tour. Himalayan Experience is able to arrange transfers for you at an additional cost for early arrival and late departure . Arrival and departure transfers as well as pre and post accommodation can be organized on request. Alternatively, if you take taxi on your own, it will cost you approx: $ 10 to the city.

 

Q. What time can I check in and out at my accommodation?

Generally check-in and out is 12:00 Noon. However some time room may not be ready to check in if they have group check out at 12:00 noon. It will take some time for them to make your room ready.

 

Q. Are there western toilets available?

Accommodation in Kathmandu and very modern and have western toilets. Some lodges have regular access to western toilets while others don't. More remote the place the less likely you are to find western toilet facilities. Some lodges you will be staying will have private bathrooms.

 

Q. What is the currency in my destination?

While traveling in Nepal: Australian $ or US$ both currency are accepted by banks or hotels in Kathmandu. When you travel out of Kathmandu or Pokhara, please take Local currency. When you travel India, Tibet and Bhutan US$ is excepted widely compare to AU$.

 

Q. Are flights included?

The prices are quoted 'land only'. You may be starting your trip from any part of the world. You may also have different airline preferences and affiliations. Some of you may choose to book your international flight with your local travel agent, directly with an airline or via an online site. we also offer the option to purchase international air tickets. For Everest Base camp Trek, domestic flight to and from Lukla is included.

 

Q. Who will be my guide/leader?

This depends on the trip. Himalayan Experience Group Adventures are led by an experienced local leaders, who have enough experience and know their own country intimately. Also designed to support economy to create the job. So Himalayan Experience could offer the very competitive price.

 

Q. Why are your prices so low?

Himalayan Experience’s Director is from Himalayan region with 20 years of local tour organising experience. Dipak Dhamala also knows the suppliers very well. Our local travel agent uses well experience local tour leaders. Our trips are also run on a twin share basis, so single travellers do not have to pay a single supplement. We know the best of what to see and do, so we save you money by using your time efficiently.

 

Q. Is it possible to make any changes to the itinerary?

No. It is not possible to make any changes to our group trip itineraries, unless it is a private trip and suitable to change at the time. However, it will be changed according to the circumstances.

 

Q. What is included in the trip price?

All accommodation as listed in the itinerary [4 nights in Kathmandu and 12 nights on the trek]

All transport listed in the itinerary

Sightseeing and meals as listed in the Itinerary [2 half day sightseeing Kathmandu with all permits and guide]

All permits and national park fees for the trek

Kathmandu – Lukla return flight

Lodge accommodation on the trek

Guide

Porte

Duffle bag

 

The land price of your trip does not include:

International or internal flights unless specified

Taxes and excess baggage charges unless specified

Meals other than those specified in the itinerary

Visa and passport fees

Travel insurance

Optional activities and sightseeing and all personal expenses

 

Q. What happens if local flight get cancelled from Kathmandu?

If the local flight get cancelled due to the bad weather, before you fly to Lukla, Himalayan Experience’s local representative will book the available accommodation on you own expenses. But Can not guarantee the standard of accommodation as it is last minute arrangements.

 

Q. What happens if the flight get cancelled in Lukla?

Accommodation will be provided with breakfast. Local travel agent will reorganize the next available flight.

 

Q. What are the challenges:

Flight could get cancelled due to bad weather and you may get to wait to catch the next available flight

There could be heavy snow falls. You may have stay in one place until it is possible and safe enough to walk to next place.

Chances of getting high altitude sickness. If possible, will be taken to the nearest health post and also use of altitude chamber. Most of the time walking down hill might help. But if it is acute then, helicopter rescue may require.

There could arise some un-fore seen challenges.

 

Q. What happens if I can not continue the trek all the way to Everest base camp?

There will be some support staff for guide. One Support staff will be allocated for every 4-5 trekking member. Some time you may be walking back with porter and wait for other members to arrive.

 

Q. Can I book a single room?

You can book pre and post accommodation on a single basis however throughout your Himalayan Experience trip, rooming is organised on a twin share basis.

 

Q. Safety Information

Himalayan Experience runs trips in keeping with a basic travel safety policy. Should our local travel operator on the ground deem an area unsafe, trips will be cancelled so as to minimise risks to our groups. Please keep up to date with http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/tips/checklist.html or other reliable sources as well.

 

Q. What is the best time of year to travel? What is the weather expected to be like in my chosen destination at the time I want to travel?

The Himalayan Experience pre-departure information provides guidelines about the trip. If you need to look at the current or next few days weather from Kathmandu, please visit www.himalayanexperience.net and click the climate watch box.

 

Q. Can I take a suitcase?

Yes you can bring the suitcase to Kathmandu and Chitwan. But there is weight limit for Kathmandu – Lukla flight. You are allowed to bring on 15 Kilos including hand carry. (5kg hand carry and 10 kg carry luggage).

Himalayan Experience will provide a free duffle bag at the hotel who likes to use. They are not waterproof. You may like to take some plastic bags or waterproof cover to protect your personal clothing.

We would still recommend that you bring a backpack or soft bag. Porters are not always available to carry your luggage for you.

 

Q. Can I store excess luggage at the starting point hotel?

Yes. Starting point hotels can store your excess luggage for you at your own risk. Some time nominal fee is charged for this service.

 

Q. Do I need to bring a sleeping bag?

Please refer to the packing 'checklist' on your Trip Notes. But if you are going to Nepal, it can be hired easily in Kathmandu @ $ 3 per day.

 

Q. Is Himalayan Experience financially secure?

Yes. Travel Compensation Fund (TCF) is a legislated body governing the licensing and operation of travel agents in Australia except Northern Territory. Himalayan Experience has substantial financial reserves that requirements set down by Travel Compensation Fund [TCF]. Himalayan Experience’s Client Trust Account is audited and monitored yearly in accordance with TCF standards.

 

If we haven't answered yet?

Please contact us at

Himalayan Experience: Tel: 02 800 375 44

Dipak Dhamala: Hot line: 0430 488 222

E-mail: info@himalayan-experience.net

Web: www.himalayan-experience.net

Group departure dates: 

2015
21-Sep    29-Sep     11-Oct     23-Oct    4-Nov    16-Nov    15-Dec

2015
7-Jan    1-Feb    25-Feb    10-Mar    23-Mar    1-Apr    13-Apr    26-Apr

Recommended equipment/packing list

Footwear:

  • Well broken-in walking shoes - these must be suitable for snow
  •  thick socks
  • light socks
  • camp shoes / slippers

Clothing:

  • Down or fibre filled waterproof jacket and trousers
  • Sweater or fleece jacket
  • underwear
  • warm and cotton trousers or jeans
  • shirts and T-shirts
  • thermals
  • wool hat
  • Sun hat
  • Gloves
  • Bathing suit
  • Track suit

Other equipment:

  • Sleeping bag (4 seasons)
  • Trekking holdhall or stash sack with lock (keep approx 10kg – weight restriction at the domestic flight)
  • Day pack
  • Water bottle
  • Sun cream
  • Sunglasses
  • Small alarm clock
  • 5 small clothes pegs
  • head torch / flashlight with spare bulbs and batteries
  • gaiters (optional, for walking through snow)
  • walking poles (optional, helps on icy path)

Other items:

  • Insect repellent
  • toilet articles
  • wet wipes (very handy)
  • small bottle of hand sanitizer
  • lip salve
  • plasters
  • personal medical kit
  • diamox / altitude sickness tablets
  • water purification tablets
  • toilet roll
  • laundry soap
  • laundry bag
  • pocket knife
  • small towel
  • sewing kit
  • binoculars
  • camera
  • cards
  • diary
  • Polar / cotton Liner for sleeping bag
  • Pillow Case

Admin:

  • Approx: $20-30 cash for your meal. If you go to high classes restaurants, will cost more.
  • 4 x passport size photos (2 for Nepal entry visa, 2 for trekking registration)
  • Lightweight gifts - pens & pencils etc.
  • Photocopy of visa, passport & insurance
  • Money for tipping guides & porters (withdraw before start of trek, as no access to ATM on the trek)

Notes:It is much cheaper (& better for the Nepali economy) to gear up in Kathmandu. You can buy anything you
need including down jackets, gaiters, walking poles, power adaptors ($3), stash sacks ($10), diamox &
water purification tablets. Jackets & sleeping bags can also be hired. ($3 ea. per day) Quality is not up to
Australian standards, but will do, most of the time.